Chess 5: King Takes Queen

These chess problems require you to understand the rules of chess. Assume White is on the bottom.

Expected difficulty EasyComment/E-mail if you want a solution to be published

Stipulation (14+16) Proof game in 4.0. That is, achieve the given position after Black’s 4th move.

An attempt at proof games.

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Chess 4: How Is Castling Possible Again?

These chess problems require you to understand the rules of chess. Assume White is on the bottom.

Expected difficulty MediumComment/E-mail if you want a solution to be published

Stipulation (12+13) White can still castle. Which unit made White’s last move? (Note that you’re not told whose move it is.)

Here’s one more. Apparently constructing chess compositions is harder than constructing logic puzzles…

Chess 3: Weirdest Stipulation Ever

These chess problems require you to understand the rules of chess.

Expected difficulty MediumComment/E-mail if you want a solution to be published

Stipulations Color the pieces so that there exists a game where this position is illegal due to FIDE Chess Law 5.2b (also known as Dead Reckoning), but legal otherwise.

Made from phone, so it’s hard to add comments, but it’s basically a really stupid problem. I might put the solution soon. And I’m expecting a cook here, that there exists other solutions I didn’t consider or something. But if there’s none then, well, good.

Chess 2: Missing Piece

These chess problems require you to understand the rules of chess.

Expected difficulty MediumComment/E-mail if you want a solution to be published

Stipulations a) On what square was the rook on f1 at the beginning of the game? b) What color and piece is on h2 (the black circle)? Mention all pieces that can be on that square. (Just so part a is well-defined, I assure you at least one piece works.)

So here’s another one, which I should say is the best piece I’ve ever composed to date. (Yes, if this is the best piece then you know how beginner I am in compositions.) I might post some problems that aren’t composed by me, but I find interesting nevertheless…

Chess 1: A Long First Step

These chess problems require you to understand the rules of chess. Assume White is on the bottom.

Expected difficulty EasyComment/E-mail if you want a solution to be published

Stipulations a) Is the position legal? b) Move pawn f7 to g7; is the position legal?

EDIT: Puzzle edited on 7 February.

I call this Chess 0. 😛

Yes, with at least one positive feedback, I’m starting to post these. I’m also a relatively newcomer to the field, so my difficulty rating will be based on my current knowledge at the time of the posts. And don’t expect a lot of stuff, since constructing these is way harder than constructing the usual deductive logic puzzle content. Expect more retro chess problems (or perhaps helpmates and similar), those that don’t require thinking like chess players.

Also, I might consider adding a new difficulty rating “Introductory”, which should be self-explanatory. (Retro 0 is Introductory.)

Chess 0: Chess Problems Begin!

This blog is partially known by its puzzle content. But it’s still my creation, so I still post content according to what I like.

Lately I’m interested in retrograde analysis; that is, analyzing chess positions and problems that require looking to the past. Say, can you figure out the last move (precisely; the piece, the squares moved from and to, the piece captured if any, and any other stuff) from this position?

I’m interested on knowing how many of you like this kind of content. If there’s nobody, I might post my problems only on Chess.com, or something…just see. 😛